My views on the Liberal Democrats in government

I was asked a question in the comments to the previous post by an “anonymous fan“. (A fan? Wowser.) What do you make of the Lib Dems being in government and to what extent do you still support them? I thought the question would be of wider interest, so I have decided to respond in […]

Why a Conservativeā€”Lib Dem coalition may not be a bad thing

No doubt, election night was a very disappointing one for me. I was involved in the Liberal Democrat campaign in Dunfermline, and I attended the count. There was disappointment in Dunfermline — but we always expected it to be very difficult to hang on there. So while it was very disappointing to lose in Dunfermline, […]

Aftermath of the European Parliamentary election

The Europe-wide picture The consensus seems to be that, Europe-wide, it was a good election for the centre-right. It certainly seems as though the governing centre-left parties have taken a bit of a battering, while voters seem content with centre-right governments. Those of a socialist persuasion may well feel disgruntled. In the midst of an […]

How should politics be reformed?: Part 1

The crisis currently facing politics in the UK is massive. Citizens feel detached from the political process and trust in politicians is rock-bottom. It’s been widely noted that this is a perfect opportunity to reform the rotten system. I only want to briefly cover the main ideas for reform, so I will use The Guardian’s […]

Scottish budget: I can’t blame the Greens

Scottish politics became exciting and sexy yesterday. Sexy as politics goes anyway. The excitement is over the fact that the SNP have failed to persuade the Scottish Parliament to back its budget. Cue lots of finger pointing. It’s the sort of thing that makes members of the public disdainful of politicians. I chose to listen […]

A surprise in Glenrothes

The shock is not so much that Labour won. I had a feeling in my water as long as a month ago that Labour might win, even when the bookies and the pundits were saying otherwise. But the scale of Labour’s victory must have shocked everyone. Yesterday, the BBC’s coverage began on the premise that […]

The Conservative dimension

As for other aspects of the Glasgow East result, the collapse of the Lib Dems in particular can be put down to the fact that the two main parties are broadly centre-left. So Lib Dem voters will have been especially more willing to lend their vote to one of the main parties. Conservatives will be […]

Electoral reform: a different answer

A few weeks ago I attended a talk by Eric Maskin, who this year was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics for having laid the foundations of mechanism design theory. Eric Maskin seems to be quite an interesting person. He lives in a house that was once occupied by Albert Einstein. I imagine that […]

Labcon’s big electoral reform fibs

Iain Dale has written a post about PR (via MMVC). He’s not in favour. His reasons? Whatever system emerged would be bound to ruin the link between MPs and their constituencies. Oh really? Just look at the system for electing MEPs. I suspect only a small proportion of the people reading this could name their […]

FPTP benefits extremist parties

You might have seen in my linklog that Make My Vote Count is spending this week debunking myths about proportional representation. Today’s is my favourite, Proportional representation helps extremist parties get into power. It’s a bit of a funny one because this year we saw a clear case of First Past the Post benefiting the […]