Hamilton: How very DARE Alonso try and race me?

Lewis Hamilton has been at it again with the whining. This time he is “fuming” over the fact that Fernando Alonso had the audacity to try and have a motor race with him. In the middle of a Grand Prix as well! Whatever will happen next!

It is true that Hamilton was forced onto the run-off area by Alonso’s aggressive move. But you see such a thing happen probably about a dozen times a year. It is just part of motor racing. Indeed, Hamilton himself came very close to doing the same thing to Felipe Massa at Monza last week.

It was an immensely exciting start. The possibility of fireworks between Alonso and Hamilton is real and mouthwatering. We almost got that at Spa with the battle at the first corner. What’s more, Hamilton got a good run out of La Source and ended up going side-by-side with Alonso into the entry to the intimidating Eau Rouge corner.

This is what motor racing is about. If Hamilton doesn’t like it, he ought to go fishing instead.

19 comments

  1. hehe well I did think that Alonso’s first manoeuvre WAS particularly aggressive. He actually seemed to come straight out of the blocks and head directly to his left into the side of Hamilton to .. well to do what? Clearly either intimidate Hamilton or possibly but unlikely worse. Then the second manoeuvre around the first corner of pushing Hamilton off was just a finishing move.
    Sure it could be seen as regular F1 driving between teams, but between drivers in the SAME team it’s a bit much really imo. You should do all you can to avoid taking your team mate out. After all what team is going to want someone how drives like that at their team mate.
    Webber’s move in squeezing the other driver onto the dirty part of the track thereby slowing down however – was a great move.

  2. Taking your teammate out is generally regarded as stupidity as they are trying to get as many constructor points as possible – but now that McLaren can’t earn any points it’s a bit redundant (although it will reduce their fine if they can maximise their points).

    What Alonso did was fair enough in my view, he knew the run-off was huge at that corner and Hamilton didn’t exactly lose out as he was still side by side going into the next corner. You can bet that if it had been Alonso who had lifted going into Eau Rouge, thereby letting Hamilton past, then James Allen and every other member of the British media would be singing his praises!!

  3. This is, again, a straw man. When did you decide that it was fine to start creating stories out of thin air?

    The link you provide to support the idea that Hamilton was “fuming” does no such thing. He’s not happy about it, but what would have expected him to say in such a circumstance? He says it was “hard” – that does not seem to me to be “fuming” or “whining”.

    You appear to have some kind of blind spot about Hamilton which allows you to write utter nonsense and discredits the rest of the material you post here.

  4. Rory, “fumes” is the word the BBC use in the headline, which is the only reason I used the word in this post (and also the reason I put it in quotation marks).

    They have also been using similar language on the radio reports (this was the top sport story on Radio 5 Live all morning), while ITV-F1 says that he “vented his anger”. So I hardly think that I have created this story out of thin air!

  5. Taking your teammate out is generally regarded as stupidity as they are trying to get as many constructor points as possible – but now that McLaren can’t earn any points it’s a bit redundant

    id say it doesnt matter if they cant get constructors points, you still avoid taking your team mate out.

    I think the move around the hairpin was OK, but the fact that followed the initial lurch at Hamilton off the starting line just makes me wary of Alonso’s motives and thoughts on that second hairpin when he squeezed out Hamilton.

    Were I a team manager, I for one would not want Alonso in my team.

  6. Also re Alonso’s start: Didn’t HE start on the clean (good) side and Hamilton on the dirty (bad) side? If so, what good reason is there for Alonso spearing himself at Hamilton AND the bad side of the track?
    Did he fear Hamilton making another great start? Or was he making an “I’m here” point?

  7. In recent grand prix, hasn’t Hamilotn been in the habit of lining up exactly as Alonso did on the grid at Spa?

    I seem to recall that being a good thing then as it showed he was a racer and wanted to ensure he kept the others behind him – now Alonso does it, it’s a negative and dangerous ploy! 😉

  8. In recent grand prix, hasn’t Hamilotn been in the habit of lining up exactly as Alonso did on the grid at Spa?

    What, starting on the clean side and pointing at the dirty side? Are you sure?

  9. Maybe not clean to dirty, but he has definitely lined up pointing at the opposite side to that he has been on in order to keep the guy behind him from getting past.

    It’s a relatively commonsense thing to do, you can’t win races if you let people overtake you!

  10. Dirty to clean is fair enough, but I thought that the advantage of staying on the clean side FAR outweighed trying to get off the start and move over to the dirty side in front of a rival then get around the first corner on the dirty side.

  11. It would be interesting to see if Alonso had stayed on the clean side whether he would have actually been able to challenge Massa for the first corner, and possibly even lead the drivers championship now (given the Ferrari pace though, that would be doubtful he would be able to hold Massa back for the whole race). I don’t know how ‘dirty’ the dirty side is in Spa. Given that Lewis and Massa didn’t cut across to the clean side, I don’t think there was much in it.

    The move was fair. a little hard perhaps, and he was making a point, but he had the line for the corner and had nothing to lose. I believe the ‘fuming’ angle is more the press than Lewis.

    I wonder what the bookies will give me for a championship-deciding collision a la Prost/Senna…?

  12. One thing’s for sure, It’s certainly shaping up for a close and exciting end to the season.
    I’d like to see Hamilton JUST miss the championship this year and go on to completely TONK the field next year.

  13. That’s actually what I would prefer to see Matthew. I don’t think Hamilton quite deserves to be champion this year. He is not yet the complete package (witness his efforts at the Nürburgring in the rain). But it’s only a matter of time, and I can imagine Hamilton being more dominant within a couple of years.

    It would be nice to see a rookie win the championship. But it would also be cool to see Alonso win three titles in a row with two different teams.

  14. Re “clean to dirty”, Alonso started on the dirty side and the inside – he moved to the clean side asap (of course), to the right side to brake for the corner (of course) and to cover the guy behind him (of course). He was also ahead into the corner, and during the whole “non incident”.

    Really, what did Hamilton EXPECT? He’s racing Alonso for the title, screwed him over in Hungary, and has been mouthing off in the press. Then he decides to place himself outside Alonso and expects Alonso to roll over and just let Hamilton drive past? Seriously, I’d have lost all respect for Alonso if he didn’t robustly defend his position. No constructor points to care about, even if that were the main thing – of course he will defend.

    From Hamilton’s viewpoint, it’s okay to chuckle about “Oops I came from a bit far back” when lunging past and banging wheels with Kimi at Monza (absolutely fair, and no complaint from anyone), but not okay when Alonso doesn’t allow the same (no complaint from anyone but Hamilton – not the UK media, not any other driver asked, not Ron Dennis – only Lewis).

    If he believes there was an issue he needs to grow up. If he’s trying to play the media (as I hope is the case)…do it better.

  15. Re “clean to dirty”, Alonso started on the dirty side and the inside – he moved to the clean side asap (of course), to the right side to brake for the corner (of course) and to cover the guy behind him (of course). He was also ahead into the corner, and during the whole “non incident”.

    Youre sure he started on the dirty side? Surely pole starts on the clean side and he was right behind pole in 3rd place was he not? If not then fair enough but it still seemed like a deliberate lunge at Hamilton which could have potentially taken both of them out. A fair risk if youre not in the same team but even if the team arent fighting for the constructors championship it’s a dodgy manoeuvre at best

  16. Actually, pole is not always on the “clean” side – which has led to some complaints in the past. Nobody mentioned anything about a clean or dusty side at Spa before the incident so I presume it’s not much of an issue there.

    Raikkonen stands a very good chance of the championship this year because Lou and Nando are almost bound to push each other off in one of the last races. And next year Lou might find he has more competition than everyone expects. There is a guy called Rosberg to think about, f’rinstance, not to mention the outside chance that Gary Paffett will be Hamilton’s team mate. Plus there’s no guarantee that next year’s McLaren will be any good. BMW are looking possibles and you can’t write off Renault (you can, however, write off Ferrari – their reliability problems this year are merely the forerunners of the degeneration that is bound to occur after the changes to the team made by Montezemolo).

    My money’s on Heidfeld.

  17. The racing line at Spa diagonals across from back right to front left (as you look from the back of the grid). For whatever reason pole was set up on the dirty side, I can only presume since the run to La Source is rather short, it is to give the polesitter the inside line to keep an advantage even if he got a slightly poor start.

    I just watched the recording again, and there was no lunge from Alonso – just a smooth, deliberate, controlled squeeze off the track. But what on earth should Hamilton expect? You put your car there against your championship rival, he is NOT going to let you past. In that situation I would have expected any of the top drivers to close the door, and any other of them to use the media to try to pressurise the other driver that it was dangerous, and have stewards watch them in future. I think this is what Hamilton was doing, but he did it rather badly and it just came across as whining. I’m giving him the benefit of the doubt – I hope he doesn’t really think that’s unreasonable, or he really has got a lot of learning to do 🙂

  18. It looked like a clear diversion from the racing line over to block Hamilton of the start to me, lounge, swerve, call it what you will. As you say, the line was on the inside and Alonso disadvantaged himself by briefly going to the outside both off the start and around the first corner to prevent any chance of Hamilton from getting past him.
    If Alonso hadn’t pushed Hamilton over off the start then edged him off the track on the first corner and even put some of his own wheels on the green, could Hamilton have got past? Seems Alonso thought he was enough of a danger to have to give it a try.
    Here’s an idea, if Alonso hadn’t have taken the time and gone off line to squeeze out Hamilton could he have been up with the Ferrari’s or even in front of them?